Saturday, February 25, 2017

Eurythmy

This is a sacred dance or rhythmic and meditative movement where legends and myths are re-enacted. It was created by Rudolf Steiner, who formed the Anthroposophical Society when he broke away from Theosophy where he was a General Secretary of the German branch. Steiner was born in 1861, son of a railway worker and was mainly self taught and by his secondary school, he was teaching other pupils and he gained entry to University of Vienna where he studied sciences. His meditation practice was established by the time he moved to Berlin where he edited a literary magazine. 
There are Steiner Schools throughout the world which teach children in a way which stimulates their own interests. To find out more, follow the link: http://www.eurythmy.org.uk/faq/index.html

Sunday, February 12, 2017

How to Find Peace Of Mind Willie Horton

The normal mind is hard-wired to ensure that you will never find peace of mind. Research confirms that each of us is peppered with, on average, some fifty thousand thoughts each day. Many of these whizz through our field of consciousness at such speed that we don't notice them. Then there are those that we do notice that are simply random - the kind of stupid things that distract us or make us lose our so-called train of thought. For example, we might interrupt ourselves from what we're supposed to be doing by reminding ourselves to do something important later - which we generally forget about later! Or our mind wanders onto something completely irrelevant to the place and time in which we find ourselves. I recollect, some years ago, sitting around the board table of a bank, scanning each of my colleagues faces in the realization that none of them was present in the room! Such thoughts - like "It's a beautiful day, I wish I was on the golf course instead of stuck in this meeting" - undermine our best efforts to do what we're supposed to be doing at that point in time.

Sunday, February 5, 2017

Hellerwork


   This is an excellent video on Hellerwork (founder Joseph Heller) which is a body therapy which releases and realignes the body so that the body can work well and comfortably. When this is done, the emotions and mind automatically feel better. The method is suitable for repetitive strain injury or for long term structural pain caused through an accident but here, working on the theory of body armouring through emotional distress, the muscles and joints tense and result in stored tention which can be released through bodywork. 
For more information, visit: http://www.hellerwork.com/files/6313/9173/5260/heller.handbook.pdf 
and  http://hellerwork.com/how-it-works/


Friday, February 3, 2017

Hugh Milne - Craniosacral Specialist

Hugh Milne is Scottish and was born into a family of Osteopaths (his mother, father, grandfather and 2 uncles). Became a highly successful private specialist in Kensington early in his life but was hearing the voice of Spirit and became interested in psychodrama, gestalt, rolfing and other therapies and personal growth disciplines. Travelled to Bombay and met Bhagvan Shree Rajneesh (Osho) and spent seven years as the guru's bodyguard, in India and in Oregon. He returned to UK to become a writer, spiritual teacher and specialist practitioner.  For more information about craniosacral speciality: http://www.upledger.com/seminar_info/StudyGuides/CSTISG.pdf 

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Two Small Words Change Everything by Kay White

It's such a small thing to say 'thank you'. It costs you absolutely nothing and yet it makes a huge difference to how you are understood and remembered by people. It's often the difference that makes the difference as to whether people do what you want, it certainly affects the way they do what you ask them to and, crucially, how they respond to you - and - if they respond to you at all.Most people - if they're lucky, in my opinion are taught- from when they were a small child that 'thank you' is what you say as soon as you're given something or when someone does something for you - in my case my parents used to take something back from me until I said 'thank you' - so it was pretty simple.